Inconspicuously Clever Title

Question everything, but most often yourself

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Birthday Challenge - Water

Help me celebrate 26 rotations around the sun by donating $26 to this great organization!

Giving is great and all, but we are bombarded with crowd-funding and donation requests constantly. So why, aside from your deep abiding adoration of me (and that donating is easier than trying to pick out a present) should you donate to this? I decided to make a little challenge for all of you. If you can manage to raise the $2000 goal I will make my way to the local tattoo parlor and get a water symbol tattoo.

Why water? Well charity: water answers that question really well I think: http://www.charitywater.org/whywater/

Water is an essential part of human existence, and clean water is necessary for any community to thrive. But it isn’t the only thing we need. This year marks the beginning of a campaign I’m undertaking. Each year I will ask you to donate to a charity symbolizing one of the four elements. Each time we reach the set goal I will get that element tattooed on myself.

So what do you think? Are you up for the challenge? Donate to my campaign for water today, and tomorrow you can see your contribution immortalized on my skin.

If you want to know what else your contribution does, charity: water has you covered. 100% of every dollar you raise will directly fund water project costs, helping people in need get access to clean water. And when the project you helped fund is complete, you and your donors will get a report like this: https://my.charitywater.org/p/myprojectsview?project_id=ET.GOH.Q4.09.048.213

Interested in doing more than donating? I am still accepting tattoo designs - let me know if you want to submit something!

Don’t have $26? That’s fine - help me spread the word by sharing this! Want to up the ante? Consider donating your birthday: https://www.charitywater.org/birthdays/

Filed under water nonprofit birthday charity tattoo tattoos

7,458 notes

People sometimes say that we will know feminism has done its job when half the CEOs are women. That’s not feminism; to quote Catharine MacKinnon, it’s liberalism applied to women. Feminism will have won not when a few women get an equal piece of the oppression pie, served up in our sister’s sweat, but when all dominating hierarchies - including economic ones - are dismantled.
Lierre Keith  (via iamelliebusch)

(Source: alloffivehorizons, via cannelledusoleil)

Filed under feminism women

199,076 notes

gettingfitlosingfat:

escapedosmil:

noelledino:

deductionhunters:

chocolateist:

i-want-cheese:

bakaandty:

i-want-cheese:

blogorgtfo:

assbutt-in-the-garrison:

Back when I was younger and more ignorant and misinformed than I am now, one of my exes literally made me feel guilty sometimes when he got a boner and I didn’t want to “take care of him”. He claimed that it caused him a lot of pain and he said that his doctor had actually said he couldn’t leave himself in that state or else he could damage himself…. So made me feel like I HAD to give him relief even when I really did not desire to. And that sucked.

Wait… it DOESN’T hurt them?

Boys get boners all the time for no reason. No, it doesn’t hurt them. If any boy tries to tell you otherwise, run away as fast as you can because he’s lying to you for the sake of his penis.

No penis is more important than you because you are a whole person and a penis is just a spongy flab o’ flesh. 

Hahaha deff not I get boners constantly.
Math
Driving
Light
Anything causes them

Favorite answer so far.

Math.

Dicks can seriously be ridiculous at times

Hell sometimes a brisk breeze can set them off

Reblogging this for all of the girls and guys that DO NOT KNOW THIS INFORMATION.  Because this is extremely important.

HEY!!! 

HEYYYYYY!!!!

The term ‘blue balls’ isn’t actually a fucking thing. 

It was created by giant flopping douche canoes to con girls into rubbing their little dingadongs. 

I literally get 10 boners a day and never get blue balls. 

Next time someone tries to shame you into a handy, kick them in the balls and tell them “NOW YOU HAVE BLUE BALLS”

Guys on tumblr are literally the best.

(via cannelledusoleil)

Filed under sex funny comedy dating

146 notes

The men who are cooing reassurances to women that they’re beautiful just as they are is the equivalent of a paternalistic pat on the head, and it assumes, requires, and reinforces the idea that those women don’t know this already. So let’s say for the moment that this is true. Probably many women listening to the song don’t believe they are beautiful, and another 10,000 words could be written on the many and varied ways that that’s the fault of our mass media.

If a woman doesn’t believe she is beautiful, the solution isn’t a man telling her she’s wrong. If women have been groomed to believe that they need to look a specific way to succeed in the world, you can trust that those beliefs are so internalized and wide-ranging as to require far more than male approval and acceptance to be undone.

Now let’s assume wearing makeup isn’t about that, at least not entirely. Let’s say that these women DO know they’re beautiful, and, more importantly, that their relationships with their appearance aren’t defined by whether or not they put on makeup. That a woman might wear lipstick or curl her hair because she likes it, that she could find her own empowerment through physical appearance, completely detached from the reaction of men, is an absent concept in these songs. It seems unfathomable that there can be any satisfaction, separated from male approval, that could be gleaned from the dressing of our bodies.

And here’s the biggest problem with these musical paeans to insecurity: The women who do enjoy their bodies, who know and celebrate their beauty, don’t get syrupy love songs. Their narrative isn’t compelling. If One Direction has taught us anything, the unknowing-ness is an essential factor of their beauty. She doesn’t know she’s beautiful, and that’s what makes her beautiful.
Let’s Stop Singing Songs About Women Who Don’t Know They’re Beautiful (via brutereason)

(via brutereason)

17,958 notes

medievalpoc:

leeandlow submitted to medievalpoc:

The Diversity Gap in the highest grossing science fiction and fantasy films. Sad, right? You can see the full study here.

 I highly recommend reading the entire article. 
from the infographic:
Among the top 100 domestic grossing films:
only 8% of films star a protagonist of color
of the 8 protagonists of color, all are men; 6 are played by Will Smith and 1 is a cartoon character (Aladdin)
0% of protagonists are women of color
0% of protagonists are LGBTQ
1% of protagonists are people with a disability

medievalpoc:

leeandlow submitted to medievalpoc:

The Diversity Gap in the highest grossing science fiction and fantasy films. Sad, right? You can see the full study here.

I highly recommend reading the entire article.

from the infographic:

Among the top 100 domestic grossing films:

  • only 8% of films star a protagonist of color
  • of the 8 protagonists of color, all are men; 6 are played by Will Smith and 1 is a cartoon character (Aladdin)
  • 0% of protagonists are women of color
  • 0% of protagonists are LGBTQ
  • 1% of protagonists are people with a disability

(via gender-and-science)

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I Grew Up Hungry: Why I Give To Child Poverty Charities

literally-darling:

I Grew Up Hungry: Why I Give To Child Poverty Charities

When I look at pictures of myself as a kid, I’m always smiling. I have one of those pudding-bowl haircuts and I’m clad in classic 90’s double-denim, and my cheeky grin is peeping out from under my shaggy fringe.

What the pictures don’t convey though, is how very hungry I was. My three sisters and I never had breakfast, and packed lunches were something mythical. They were something that other…

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The Overhead Myth - Why the the percent of charity expenses that goes to administrative cost is a poor measure of a charity’s performance.

In a historic move, the leaders of the country’s three leading sources of information on nonprofits –GuideStarCharity Navigator, and BBB Wise Giving Alliance – penned an open letter to the donors of America denouncing the “overhead ratio” as a valid indicator of nonprofit performance. 

Here is the letter:

To the Donors of America:

We write to correct a misconception about what matters when deciding which charity to support.

The percent of charity expenses that go to administrative and fundraising costs—commonly referred to as “overhead”—is a poor measure of a charity’s performance.

We ask you to pay attention to other factors of nonprofit performance:  transparency, governance, leadership, and results.  For years, each of our organizations has been working to increase the depth and breadth of the information we provide to donors in these areas so as to provide a much fuller picture of a charity’s performance.

That is not to say that overhead has no role in ensuring charity accountability. At the extremes the overhead ratio can offer insight: it can be a valid data point for rooting out fraud and poor financial management.  In most cases, however, focusing on overhead without considering other critical dimensions of a charity’s financial and organizational performance can do more damage than good.

In fact, many charities should spend more on overhead.  Overhead costs include important investments charities make to improve their work: investments in training, planning, evaluation, and internal systems—as well as their efforts to raise money so they can operate their programs.  These expenses allow a charity to sustain itself (the way a family has to pay the electric bill) or to improve itself (the way a family might invest in college tuition).

When we focus solely or predominantly on overhead, we can create what the Stanford Social Innovation Review has called “The Nonprofit Starvation Cycle.”  We starve charities of the freedom they need to best serve the people and communities they are trying to serve.

If you don’t believe us—America’s three leading sources of information about charities, each used by millions of donors every year—see the back of this letter for research from other experts including Indiana University, the Urban Institute, and others that proves the point.

So when you are making your charitable giving decisions, please consider the whole picture.  The people and communities served by charities don’t need low overhead, they need high performance.

Thank you,

Art Taylor
President & CEO
BBB Wise Giving Alliance
Jacob Harold
President & CEO
GuideStar
Ken Berger
President & CEO
Charity Navigator

Filed under nonprofit non profit overhead charity giving donors